It's all about the numbers.

Our informational (we hope) and slightly irreverent (we think) take on all things analytics in the world of digital marketing and technology.
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Social logins have become the norm (BTW, although the chart does not have a legend the blue bar are the 2012 levels and the green ones 2014).

The Economist is looking to outstrip competitors’ ad sales by launching two guarantee-backed ad measures promising increased audience engagement. The TimeGuarantee ensures that mobile audiences will spend at least 250 cumulative hours with an ad over the course of a campaign, which usually runs two to three weeks. The second measure, called the ViewGuarantee, provides that 75 percent of impressions across an entire campaign will be viewed for at least one second, a 25 percent higher standard for viewable impressions than the International Advertising Bureau’s (IAB’s) recommendation of 50 percent.

After the announcement of Chartbeat getting certification for its attention metrics, The Economist follows in this new analytics path and promises advertisers engagement/attention from its audience. Is this a trend?

(from: The Economist Sells Attention Instead of Clicks With New Ad Guarantees | ClickZ)

Nice, informational infographic from Google about programmatic buying.

If this doesn’t make the case for integrated marketing (at least for CPG brands, the subject of this study), we don’t know what will.

Thanks to mobile devices, consumers now start researching retail products way before they step into a store to buy, according to a June 2014 study by Ninth Decimal. The research found that 81% of US mobile users turned to their devices to research retail items at home or work—meaning before heading to a brick-and-mortar—while 19% engaged with mobile during a shopping trip.

Important research shows the many ways mobile affects purchases and the strength of that impact.

(from: Mobile Affects Purchases Way Before the Store - eMarketer)

Unlike pageviews, which simply measure whether a page has loaded, or even unique visitors — which some media companies argue are closer to being like physical readers of a newspaper or magazine — attention metrics like “active exposure time,” which Chartbeat tracks, can determine how much time a reader spent with a specific piece of content, by measuring whether they were actually looking at the page.
Chartbeat gets its certification by the Media Ratings Council to measure attention. Glad to see some evolution (improvements?) in the old online ad business. (from: Chartbeat gets certified to measure attention, tries to move advertising away from clicks and pageviews — Tech News and Analysis)
The CPG Marketing Reinvented report found that localized digital activation has a bigger direct marketing sway than television ads for CPG brands. Key findings include that 35 percent of moms and 29 percent of dads say the most frustrating thing about online and mobile ads is when the content is not locally relevant to in-store products and prices.
Interesting findings (and conclusions) about CPG marketing and TV vs. digital. (from: CPG brands’ localized digital activations more influential than TV ads: report - Mobile Marketer - Research)

#FridayFunFact: these are pretty crazy binge watching numbers: 90 minutes average per subscriber!

Although the information and how-to portion of this article about how to make good infographics was great (and very much needed if the latest infographics we have come across are any indication), what really tickled our analytical/stats obsession was this Google chart above.

Although the information and how-to portion of this article about how to make good infographics was great (and very much needed if the latest infographics we have come across are any indication), what really tickled our analytical/stats obsession was this Google chart above.

It’s amazing (and worrying) to us that agencies lag so significantly behind brands in their adoption of trends and technologies.  Aren’t they supposed to be the forward thinkers, the experts, the risk takers, the strategists? Or isn’t it why brands hire them?