It's all about the numbers.

Our informational (we hope) and slightly irreverent (we think) take on all things analytics in the world of digital marketing and technology.
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Here are some interesting stats going into a bit more depth on the numbers we posted today about the share of time spent on various media, with online video figures and tablet vs. phone media usage:

Lots of very interesting trends in this chart.  But beyond the obvious growth and, now, domination of digital media, we can’t help noticing that, within digital media, mobile passed online (call us obsessed with mobile everything).

Really nifty feature for the new version of this Big Data analytics tool, Datameer.  We always appreciate companies who think about the visualization of data and data analyses and do good work on this oft-ignored area.

Really nifty feature for the new version of this Big Data analytics tool, Datameer.  We always appreciate companies who think about the visualization of data and data analyses and do good work on this oft-ignored area.

Facebook remains the absolute market leader and now powers more than 51 percent of all social logins in North America. Google is the second most popular service, but at 31 percent in North America, it remains far behind Facebook.

And the domination is even more striking for mobile social logins:

(from: Facebook Now Powers More Than Half Of All Social Logins | TechCrunch)

Seventy-six percent of marketers say big data is important to success, but most aren’t using it to make informed decisions, “trusting [their] gut” instead.
Yes, 49% of marketers trust their gut on marketing spend decisions. No wonder marketing has a bad name… More (not so great for marketers) findings in the Slideshare presentation embedded in the article. (from: Digital Roadblock: Marketers Struggle to Reinvent Themselves - SocialTimes)

Ugly chart (design-wise) but the story remains the same: Facebook and, to a lesser extent, Pinterest utterly dominate social sharing.

Aside from the 21 percent of sites that loaded in less than four seconds, 31 percent of the sites took between eight and 48 seconds to load. The remaining 48 percent of sites had a load time between four and eight seconds. The mean load time for the sites was 7.95 seconds, and the median time was 5.82 seconds. The speediest responsive site clocked a .54 second load time, and the heaviest responsive site took 48.08 seconds to load.
Responsive is great but the reliance by designers on big and beautiful images is causing significant slowdown for sites’ load times. And we know load times are critical to site engagement. The article goes on to show what the impact of optimization is. Good stuff. (from: Image-heavy responsive sites drag down mobile performance: report - Research - Mobile Marketer)
#FridayFunFact: LinkedIn announced Friday it has reached 300 million registered users, a jump from 277 million members at the beginning of the year. LinkedIn announced the 200 million user milestone in January 2013, which means the company has added an average of 6.6 million new users per month over the past 15 months.

Impressive growth (and absolute numbers) for LinkedIn. Their mobile growth and focus is also to be congratulated:

LinkedIn is growing, and the company plans to continue doing so with mobile as a focus. LinkedIn is growing, and the company plans to continue doing so with mobile as a focus. LinkedIn expects that 50% of its user traffic will come via mobile by the end of 2014, and recently added an Android app for SlideShare in an effort to build out its mobile offerings. The site already receives more than 50% of its traffic via mobile from countries like Costa Rica, Malaysia, Singapore and the UK, according to a LinkedIn blog post.

(frm: LinkedIn Hits 300 Million Users Amid Mobile Push)

Interesting take on social media analytics (as they apply to social media presence mostly).  And inexpensive.  We will try to take it for a spin.

(via whitengray)

Intel’s challenge in the internet of things will be directed at building an array of products with each optimized for different variables at price points that make sense for tiny devices.
Following up on our previous post, this (rather geeky) article discusses the challenges in the Internet of Things chip/software arena. (from: The internet of things is great for chipmakers and a challenge for Intel — Tech News and Analysis)